PET OF THE MONTH – September 2015

09/01/2015This is STEW-IT, a male rabbit that is one of our oldest bunny patients at 11 years old!! We all love seeing this little old bun and his human dad when he comes in for visits.

This is STEW-IT, a male rabbit that is one of our oldest bunny patients at 11 years old!! We all love seeing this little old bun and his human dad when he comes in for visits.

Floppy Bunny Syndrome — Not Such a Poor Prognosis!

08/19/2015Floppy rabbit syndrome is one of the more dramatic and alarming conditions that a rabbit owner can experience. Fortunately, the prognosis for most cases is good with proper supportive care.This syndrome usually presents with acute onset weakness to flaccid (floppy) paralysis of the skeletal muscles of the body. Seriously affected rabbits may not be able to...

Floppy rabbit syndrome is one of the more dramatic and alarming conditions that a rabbit owner can experience. Fortunately, the prognosis for most cases is good with proper supportive care.

This syndrome usually presents with acute onset weakness to flaccid (floppy) paralysis of the skeletal muscles of the body. Seriously affected rabbits may not be able to do anything but lie on their sides, and less severely affected animals may be able to sit up and eat, but not be able to hop around very much. Many owners will find their rabbits in such a state in the morning, or after they come home from work or school.

The cause of this condition is most likely multifactorial. A stressful incident may precede an attack, or a pre-existing illness. Many rabbits that have been affected by floppy rabbit syndrome also test positive for Encephalitozoon cuniculi, a parasite that is common in rabbits, and can cause other neurological problems. Plant toxins have been theorized to have an effect as well, but many affected rabbits also do not have access to toxic plants. However, in many cases an exact cause cannot be identified. At this point in time, the pathophysiology of this condition is unclear.

It is important not to misdiagnose floppy rabbit syndrome as a spinal fracture, as the prognoses for both conditions are vastly different. Careful palpation and x-rays can help differentiate these conditions, as well as a good history.

The majority of rabbits affected by floppy rabbit syndrome will recover within 2 to 7 days, and it appears that the severity of the condition does affect the length of recovery time. Treatment is supportive, and this includes anti-inflammatory medications, pro-kinetics to help the gastrointestinal system keep working, keeping the rabbit calm and warm, maintaining proper hydration, frequent supplementary feeding with a formula such as Ox
bow Critical Care, and supporting the rabbit on his or her chest with a rolled up towel. Complications of this syndrome include gastrointestinal stasis and hypothermia, which can be minimized by appropriate feeding and housing during this time. Corticosteroids are contraindicated.

It is advisable to also test affected rabbits for E. cuniculi. Vetpath in Western Australia offers testing for E. cuniculi.

August is Pet Dental Health Month!

08/13/2015Here at The Unusual Pet Vets we care a lot about your pets teeth!This is why we are taking part in Pet Dental Health Month. For the whole month of August we will be offering a 20% discount on all dental check consultations. We will also be running a raffle for those clients who do bring their pets in for dental checks. The prize at the end of the month for...

Here at The Unusual Pet Vets we care a lot about your pets teeth!

This is why we are taking part in Pet Dental Health Month. For the whole month of August we will be offering a 20% discount on all dental check consultations. We will also be running a raffle for those clients who do bring their pets in for dental checks. The prize at the end of the month for the lucky person who is selected, will be a $100 gift voucher that can be used on any UPV product or veterinary service of the clients choice!

Teeth are so important and can be the cause of many medical problems in our exotic species, so call us today to book in your pets next dental check!

Oxbow Critical Care

08/07/2015Oxbow Animal Health is an internationally-recognized brand committed to serving the needs of small exotic animals by providing superior nutrition.One of our favourite and most used product of theirs here at The Unusual Pet Vets, is their Critical Care Powdered Supplement Feed.Critical Care is a premium recovery food which can be given to herbivores suc...

Oxbow Animal Health is an internationally-recognized brand committed to serving the needs of small exotic animals by providing superior nutrition.

One of our favourite and most used product of theirs here at The Unusual Pet Vets, is their Critical Care Powdered Supplement Feed.

Critical Care is a premium recovery food which can be given to herbivores such as rabbits and guinea pigs that are unwilling to eat their normal diet due to illness or surgery. This specially-formulated product contains all the essential nutrients of a complete diet as well
as high-fibre timothy hay to ensure proper gut physiology and digestion.

Critical Care is our go-to product for any rabbit or guinea pig that is not eating, and we recommend it to all our clients for their pets at home first aid kits.

It is available in a few flavours—apple and banana, aniseed and a fine grind formula and is stocked at both our clinics for purchase.

Pop in and grab some today!

HAY, did you know?

08/03/2015As we all know, rabbits and guinea pigs should always have hay available to them around the clock. We recommend that 70% of their diet should consist of hay to keep their teeth and guts healthy. But, did you know that there are many different types of hay?The most common type of hay to feed rabbits and guinea pigs here in Perth is oaten hay. Oaten hay is h...

As we all know, rabbits and guinea pigs should always have hay available to them around the clock. We recommend that 70% of their diet should consist of hay to keep their teeth and guts healthy. But, did you know that there are many different types of hay?

The most common type of hay to feed rabbits and guinea pigs here in Perth is oaten hay. Oaten hay is high fibre and low protein which makes it excellent to feed your pets, as well as making an excellent bedding material.

However we do know that there are many fussy rabbits and guinea pigs out there. Lucky for their owners we also stock some other varieties of hay for them to try. These include Timothy Hay which is available in 3 flavours, Botanical Hay and also Orchard Grass. These hays are produced by Oxbow and are often more appetising which makes them an excellent alternative for fussy eaters!

Lucerne hay is another option. It is a high fibre hay with more protein, energy and calcium than oaten hay. Because of this increased calcium content, lucerne hay is currently not recommended as the predominant hay in your pet’s diet, and should not be given to rabbits or guinea pigs with a history of urinary disease.

It is, however, a great hay to feed young or lactating rabbits, as they have a higher need for calcium, and can be given as an occasional treat hay to adult rabbits.

Always remember to check your hay before you feed it to your pets – black spots on hay stalks or a moist smell can indicate the growth of mould. Also look out grass seeds, which can get stuck in long coats or stuck in their eyes and noses.

And always remember – the greener it is the more your pet will love it!

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